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Impeachment, socialism and Biden-baiting: What to look for at the 2020 Democratic debates

Impeachment, socialism and Biden-baiting: What to look for at the 2020 Democratic debatesWhen 20 Democrats debate in Miami, will they support impeaching Donald Trump? Will they go after front-runner Joe Biden? And will anyone bring up age?




POSTED JUNE 23, 2019 8:59 AM

The Latest: NTSB investigates deadly Hawaii skydiving crash

The Latest: NTSB investigates deadly Hawaii skydiving crashThe National Transportation Safety Board says it will examine repair and inspection records on the skydiving plane that crashed and killed 11 people on Oahu's North Shore. The NTSB's Jennifer Homendy told reporters at the crash site Sunday that those and other records will all become part of the investigation and final report. Some details are starting to be released about the 11 victims who died when a plane carrying sky divers crashed near a small airport on the North Shore of Oahu.




POSTED JUNE 23, 2019 6:23 PM

"I Fired a Warning Shot": Here Is What a Navy SEAL Sniper Testified at the Eddie Gallagher Trial

"I Fired a Warning Shot": Here Is What a Navy SEAL Sniper Testified at the Eddie Gallagher TrialNAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — A Navy SEAL sniper testified on Friday that he fired warning shots to scare away a civilian noncombatant in Mosul before Chief Eddie Gallagher fired and told them over the radio, "you guys missed him but I got him."Under direct examination by prosecutors, Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Dalton Tolbert recounted the alleged shooting of an old man along the Tigris river during the Battle of Mosul in 2017. At the time, Tolbert was a member of SEAL Team 7 Alpha Platoon who was stationed in the south tower of a bombed out building, while Gallagher and others were stationed in the north tower.Tolbert testified that he was scanning windows along the riverbank searching for targets when he noticed a man moving closer to the river. As another SEAL explained in previous testimony, firing warning shots to keep civilians off the battlefield was a standard practice, according to their rules of engagement."I aimed to the side — far to the side — and fired," Tolbert testified. "I took the shot. The man got startled."The man then ran from the river to a nearby building and tried to go inside, but the door was locked, Tolbert said. "He ran north to south across the road," Tolbert said. "That's when I saw the red mark on his back and I saw him fall for the first time. Blood started to pool and I knew it was a square hit in the back." Over the radio, he said he heard Gallagher tell the other snipers, "you guys missed him but I got him."Tolbert said the man, who was wearing traditional garb, then stood back up and ran away.Gallagher is accused of murdering a wounded fighter and separately firing on innocent civilians during a deployment to Mosul, Iraq in 2017. He has pleaded not guilty."I saw Eddie Gallagher shoot someone who didn't deserve to die," Tolbert testified. "I shot more warning shots to save civilians from Eddie than I ever did at ISIS."Under cross-examination, Tolbert said he did not tell other snipers over the radio that the man he was firing on was a civilian he was just trying to scare away. He explained that he didn't say anything since each tower was typically covering their own sectors of fire (it was not clear which tower in this incident was firing in the wrong sector).




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 6:38 AM

Pompeo meets Saudi rulers on Iran crisis

Pompeo meets Saudi rulers on Iran crisisUS Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Monday with Saudi Arabia's rulers as he sought to coordinate with allies over soaring tensions with Iran. On a day trip scheduled after Iran shot down a US drone, Pompeo flew into the Red Sea city of Jeddah and met with King Salman at his palace.




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 1:23 PM

Missing Utah college student last seen in a park at 3 a.m.

Missing Utah college student last seen in a park at 3 a.m.A University of Utah student missing for over a week was last seen meeting an unknown person at a park at 3 in the morning, authorities said Monday. The Lyft driver who took Mackenzie Lueck from the airport and dropped her off at a park in a Salt Lake City suburb on June 17 told detectives the woman didn't seem in any distress when she met the person, said Salt Lake City assistant police chief Tim Doubt. It is located in North Salt Lake about 20 minutes from Lueck's apartment.




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 5:30 PM

UPDATE 1-Iran, Venezuela may complicate global oil deal talks - Kazakhstan

UPDATE 1-Iran, Venezuela may complicate global oil deal talks - KazakhstanTalks between OPEC and its allies next month about whether to extend their pact on cutting oil supplies "won't be easy" and may be complicated by the situation facing Iran and Venezuela, Kazakh Energy Minister Kanat Bozumbayev said. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other large oil producers, including Russia and Kazakhstan, meet in Vienna on July 1-2 to discuss whether the oil output deal, which expires after June 30, should be continued. Kazakhstan wanted the deal extended into the second half of the year, he said, describing the oil price in a range of $60-$70 per barrel as "suitable".




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 3:29 AM

Mahathir Says He Underestimated Challenge of Governing Malaysia

Mahathir Says He Underestimated Challenge of Governing Malaysia(Bloomberg) -- Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said he underestimated the challenges of governing the country before his shock election victory last year.“I underestimated because we were on the outside and we didn’t get any information on what was happening on the inside,” Mahathir said in an interview with Bloomberg Television’s Haslinda Amin in Bangkok at the 5th Bloomberg Asean Business Summit. “We are having a very tough time dealing with damages in the finances as well as the crimes that were committed.”Here are some key comments from the interview:1MDBGoldman Sachs offered “a little compensation” versus the “huge killing” it made, Mahathir said, noting he was unsure where the money lost from the 1MDB scandal has gone.The scandal surrounding 1MDB sprawls from the U.S. to Switzerland, reaching the highest levels of Malaysian politics while ensnaring Goldman Sachs Group Inc. in its first criminal case. Mahathir has raised the amount he wants to recoup from 1MDB to $7 billion after previously saying he sought $4.5 billion that U.S. prosecutors estimated went missing from the state fund. So far, the Southeast Asian country has brought back less than $500 million.Mahathir said in May he was awaiting a response from Goldman Sachs before deciding whether to take legal action against the bank over “too high” fees on 1MDB bond sales. Malaysia had already announced criminal charges against Goldman in December, accusing the lender of misleading investors when it knew that funds raised from the $6.5 billion bond offer it arranged would be misappropriated. The bank said it will defend against the allegations.ChinaMahathir disagreed he was sending a message to the U.S. by taking China’s side on certain issues. It’s “free speech,” he said. “I don’t like the old idea of cooking something up in the West and then asking us to accept them. China is a bit more sensitive to our feelings.”On the resumed multi-billion dollar rail project, he said: “We were able to renegotiate the terms of the contract. It is quite obvious that the contract was overpriced.,” he said. The government considered dropping the project altogether “but did not want to pay huge compensation on it.”The project will now cost 44 billion ringgit ($10.7 billion) instead of the original 65.5 billion ringgit, according to a statement from the prime minister’s office in April.SuccessionLast May, Mahathir led Malaysia to its first change in government since its independence from Britain in 1957. The country is set for another political shift as he is expected to hand over power to Anwar Ibrahim, who said Mahathir had made it “very clear” that Anwar would get the top seat by May next year.Mahathir said he will hand over to Anwar in “a year or so.” He doesn’t want to leave Malaysia in shambles, he said, pointing to the state of the country when his predecessor Najib Razak was ousted.“I made a promise, I keep my promise,” Mahathir said. When asked why he was reluctant to set a date for the handover, Mahathir said it was because “there may be something I need to do before I step down,” noting he wanted to fix Malaysia’s debt.When asked whether he had changed, Mahathir replied: “I don’t know, I’m still myself. Well I want to work for the country. I don’t have much of a future so the last thing I want to do is to go away leaving the country in shambles, like the previous one.”EconomyMahathir has trimmed state spending to narrow the budget deficit to 3.4% of gross domestic product this year, from a five-year high of 3.7% last year. Fiscal recovery remains fragile as the government spends billions rescuing troubled institutions from the Hajj fund to an agency overseeing farmers. His administration replaced a sweeping goods-and-services tax with a more targeted consumption tax last year, and is now counting on state oil company dividends to support revenue.The government would be careful in choosing buyers for beleaguered national carrier Malaysian Airlines Bhd, he said Friday, noting: “If there is a good offer, we will consider.”(Updates with Mahathir comment in 14th paragraph. An earlier version of this story corrected a quote in 3rd and 11th paragraphs from story that moved on Friday.)To contact the reporters on this story: Yudith Ho in Kuala Lumpur at yho35@bloomberg.net;Anisah Shukry in Kuala Lumpur at ashukry2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 1:50 AM

No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and Reddit

No, it’s not just you: Half of the internet is down, including Google, Amazon, and RedditWhat better way to start off the week than by not being able to use virtually any online service or access half of the internet's most popular sites? That seems to be the case, as DownDetector (and many tweets) suggest that Google, Amazon, Reddit, and Spectrum -- just to name a few -- are experiencing issues this morning. Those issues appear to have begun around 6 or 7 AM ET, just as the East Coast was starting its day.Although some of these connection problems appear to be clearing up as of 8:40 AM (for example, Feedly is finally loading for me after being inaccessible since before 8:00 AM), it's likely going to take some time before everything is running smoothly again. Reports are still going up on DownDetector as of writing.It's unclear what is causing half of the internet to go down, but an ominous message from Discord refers to the issue as a "general internet outage," which doesn't sound like something that should be possible:https://twitter.com/ChrisGSeaton/status/1143136635153977345About an hour ago, internet service company Cloudflare says that it "identified a possible route leak impacting some Cloudflare IP ranges." [UPDATE: To be clear, Verizon was responsible for the outage, and Cloudflare was just keeping its customers informed during the recovery process.]Cloudflare followed up with another update about an hour later explaining that the leak "is impacting many internet services including Cloudflare," and moments later, announced that the network responsible for the leak had fixed the issues as of 8:42 AM ET. In theory, the worst of the outage is over.We'll be keeping an eye out for any residual issues that pop up in the hours to come, but we also hope to get a more detailed explanation for why this happened from the network responsible in the near future.UPDATE | 3:30 PM: After service was restored, Cloudflare issued the following statement (via TechCrunch):> Earlier today, a widespread BGP routing leak affected a number of Internet services and a portion of traffic to Cloudflare. All of Cloudflare's systems continued to run normally, but traffic wasn't getting to us for a portion of our domains. At this point, the network outage has been fixed and traffic levels are returning to normal.> > BGP acts as the backbone of the Internet, routing traffic through Internet transit providers and then to services like Cloudflare. There are more than 700k routes across the Internet. By nature, route leaks are localized and can be caused by error or through malicious intent. We've written extensively about BGP and how we've adopted RPKI to help further secure it.Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince also offered a biting take of his own on Twitter:https://twitter.com/eastdakota/status/1143182575680143361




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 8:51 AM

Migrant detention conditions in Texas 'the worst I've ever seen', admits Republican after reports of lice-infested children sleeping on floors

Migrant detention conditions in Texas 'the worst I've ever seen', admits Republican after reports of lice-infested children sleeping on floorsConditions in Texas migrant detention centres are the “worst I’ve ever seen”, a Republican from the state has admitted, after reports from lawyers suggested children were enduring lice infestations, flu infections and nights sleeping on cold concrete floors.Representative Michael McCaul added that “at a minimum”, Congress should create a humanitarian aid package for young people being held near the US-Mexico border. He blamed a lack of action by politicians for the filthy conditions.Speaking on CBS’s Face The Nation programme, he said: “I’ve been down there throughout my 15 years in Congress and before that, as a federal prosecutor. This is the worst I’ve ever seen it, and it has to be taken care of.”He would vote for a “compassionate, humanitarian package” whether or not it was tied to wider border security measures, he said.It came after a lawyer working with migrant children detained at Border Patrol facilities in Texas raised concerns for their welfare.Warren Binford said she had met children who had been held for weeks at a time – when the limit is 72 hours – with hundreds living together in a windowless warehouse at one base in Clint, in El Paso county.Families were separated and older children made to care for younger ones, she told the New Yorker magazine. “The United States is taking children away from their family unit and reclassifying them as unaccompanied children.“But they were not unaccompanied children. And some of them were separated from their parents.”She added: “We received reports from children of a lice outbreak in one of the cells where there were about twenty-five children, and what they told us is that six of the children were found to have lice.“They were given a lice shampoo, and the other children were given two combs and told to share those two combs ... which is something you never do with a lice outbreak.“One of the combs was lost, and Border Patrol agents got so mad that they took away the children’s blankets and mats. They weren’t allowed to sleep on the beds, and they had to sleep on the floor ... as punishment.”Some children had not been able to shower or brush their teeth for some days, Ms Binford told the magazine, while some had caught flu.At the weekend, Mr Trump delayed a planned migration crackdown in 10 major cities “at the request of Democrats”, in order to give politicians a chance to resolve the border issue that has plagued his presidency.Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids designed to snare families who had been served with deportation orders were put back two weeks.




POSTED JUNE 23, 2019 5:57 PM

Supreme Court limits access to government records in loss for Argus Leader, part of the USA TODAY Network

Supreme Court limits access to government records in loss for Argus Leader, part of the USA TODAY NetworkThe Supreme Court issued its ruling in a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit brought by the Argus Leader of South Dakota, part of the USA TODAY Network




POSTED JUNE 24, 2019 2:03 PM

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